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All Course Descriptions

LAW 561

This course covers the legal regime applicable to federal, state and local agency decision-making and the role of the courts in reviewing agency decisions through study of the federal and Hawai‘i Administrative Procedure Acts and the case law arising under them.

This a prerequisite or recommended course for
LAW 549
Typical Course Credit: 3

An introduction to United States maritime law and admiralty jurisdiction emphasizing development of rules of maritime law and rights of seamen and maritime workers. Considers maritime liens, charter parties, salvage, collision, general average and limitation of liability, and developments relating to protection of the marine environment.

 

LAW 542
Typical Course Credit: 2

The course addresses various aspects of complex litigation and recent criticism about the civil litigation system itself. The course is theoretical in emphasis and is developed from two directions: (1) through a study of jurisprudential material concerning adversarial dispute resolution, the substance/procedure dichotomy and value-identification; and (2) through in-depth analysis of procedural aspects of complex cases (with a special focus on new procedural rules aimed at reducing waste and delay).

Prerequisites/Recommended

LAW 590W

Students in the Advanced Elder Law Clinic have already taken the Elder Law Clinic course. The overall objective of the Advanced Elder Law Clinic Course is to continue to expose students to practice areas of law that affect older persons and to ethical and other practical issues involved in providing legal services to older persons and their caregivers. In the Advanced Elder Law Clinic, special consideration will be given to the legal rights of veterans and their caregivers.

Prerequisites/Recommended

LAW 520E

Faculty members or visiting scholars present selected topics focusing upon subject areas in their area of specialty or expertise.

LAW 520F

Faculty members or visiting scholars present selected topics focusing upon subject areas in their area of specialty or expertise.

LAW 520G

Faculty members or visiting scholars present selected topics focusing upon subject areas in their area of specialty or expertise.

LAW 520H

Faculty members or visiting scholars present selected topics focusing upon subject areas in their area of specialty or expertise.

LAW 520I

Faculty members or visiting scholars present selected topics focusing upon subject areas in their area of specialty or expertise.

LAW 520J

Faculty members or visiting scholars present selected topics focusing upon subject areas in their area of specialty or expertise.

LAW 520K

Faculty members or visiting scholars present selected topics focusing upon subject areas in their area of specialty or expertise.

LAW 520M

Faculty members or visiting scholars present selected topics focusing upon subject areas in their area of specialty or expertise.

LAW 520N

Faculty members or visiting scholars present selected topics focusing upon subject areas in their area of specialty or expertise.

LAW 520O

Faculty members or visiting scholars present selected topics focusing upon subject areas in their area of specialty or expertise.

LAW 520P

Faculty members or visiting scholars present selected topics focusing upon subject areas in their area of specialty or expertise.

LAW 520Q

Faculty members or visiting scholars present selected topics focusing upon subject areas in their area of specialty or expertise.

LAW 520B

Faculty members or visiting scholars present selected topics focusing upon subject areas in their area of specialty or expertise.

LAW 520

Faculty members or visiting scholars present selected topics focusing upon subject areas in their area of specialty or expertise.

LAW 520C

Faculty members or visiting scholars present selected topics focusing upon subject areas in their area of specialty or expertise.

LAW 520D

Faculty members or visiting scholars present selected topics focusing upon subject areas in their area of specialty or expertise.

LAW 524
Typical Course Credit: 3

The first half of this course engages students in an advanced examination of tort law and policy. The second half of the course provides an introduction to insurance law and policy. Tort law subjects typically include statutes of limitation, business torts, medical malpractice, products liability, apportionment and contribution, and defamation, among others. Insurance law introduces students to basic principles of insurance including insurable interest, moral hazard, indemnity, and adverse selection. Substantive topics concern common litigation issues such as insurer duties to insureds and others in first and third party insurance; insurer bad faith claims; and the professional responsibilities of attorneys in the lawyer, insured, insurer triad. This course is of considerable importance to students interested in civil litigation and personal injury law.

Prerequisites/Recommended

(Required)
LWUL 501
Typical Course Credit: 3

Introduces conceptual and historical foundations of systems of public and private ordering in the United States and its territories and explores the roles of lawyers and the legal system in social and political change.  Supports participants as they adjust to the law school experience and seeks to sustain their connections with the communities they aim to serve and the aspirations that motivated them to study law.

LWUL 502
Typical Course Credit: 1

Introduces conceptual and historical foundations of systems of public and private ordering in the U.S. and its territories. Subjects include federalism, constitutional democracy, separation of powers, and the common law. Repeatable one time. CR/NC only.

LWPA 556
Typical Course Credit: 3

This course will examine international and comparative labor law issues facing the East Asian countries of China, Japan, and Korea, as well as the practical issues confronting American lawyers who will use labor in those countries as they do business in and with them. The course covers the effects of globalization on FDI, trade, migrant workers, and the increasingly global practice of lawyers. It puts this in the context of international players (MNCs like Wal-Mart, ILO, and ITUC) and discusses the application and effects of international labor standards, domestic, and foreign labor laws within domestic legal systems. It introduces comparative law systems and biases. The course then examines the legal systems of China, Japan, and Korea through the perspective of labor law regulation. This is followed by comparisons of these three on selected topics such as gender discrimination, ADR, role of trade unions, etc.

LWPA 553
Typical Course Credit: 3

Comparison of corporate insolvency law of selected Asian and Pacific island countries, with a focus on recently enacted laws and pending proposals that have followed the 1997 Asian Financial Crisis. Law students only. Recommended: LAW 515, LAW 554, LAW 562. (Alt. years)

LWJT 546
Typical Course Credit: 1

Students selected for the Asian-Pacific Law and Policy Journal editorial board have writing, researching, editorial and production responsibility for publication of the journal. Repeatable four times. CR/NC only.

LAW 531

After a brief survey of agency, partnerships, and other forms of business organization, the course will cover the fundamentals of corporations, and securities regulation, including disregarding the corporate entity, management and control of closely held corporations, merger, liability under the federal securities laws, takeovers, public registration, exemptions, and derivative suits.

LAW 515
Typical Course Credit: 2

This course introduces you to the law governing the relations between financially distressed business debtors (those who owe) and their creditors (those to whom obligations are owed). We will consider why businesses encounter financial troubles, and what remedies businesses may pursue outside of bankruptcy court to solve their troubles. We will then focus on business reorganization under the Federal Bankruptcy Code. We will consider, throughout the course, how creditors, debtors and their attorneys take the effects of bankruptcy law into account in (i) counseling clients, (ii) negotiating, documenting and performing contracts, (iii) reducing risk, and (iv) resolving disputes with and without litigation. Recommended: Secured Transactions (LAW 554).

Prerequisites/Recommended

LAW 590R
Typical Course Credit: 3

This class focuses on the issues pertaining to at-risk children and their families. The course is intended to be multidisciplinary in scope, applying and, ideally, blending the analytical lenses of the disciplines of law, social work, nursing, and education.  The class will be clinical in approach, with students working to make a positive impact on the lives of youth through on-site experiences at selected community programs.   Students will collaborate in multidisciplinary teams (class enrollment permitting) on projects that directly benefit young people at their community placement sites. Students will leave the course with improved practice skills, a deeper understanding of interdisciplinary interaction, and valuable connections to other child welfare professionals.

This course is offered CR/NCR for law students, but for a grade for the non-law students.  Non-law students should contact Jane Dickson Iijima for registration instructions.

LAW 514
Typical Course Credit: 2

Exploration of fundamental concepts of law relating to children, ethical issues, and the role of lawyers in assisting children, and how the child's rights and obligations are balanced with those of parents and state. (Once a year)

LWPA 578
Typical Course Credit: 3

Introduction to business and commercial law in the People's Republic of China. After a brief overview of China's political and legal systems, the course will examine basic areas of domestic business legislation, including torts, property, and contract law, the regulation of private business, the reform of state enterprises, the development of company and securities laws, and the regulation of land-use and other property rights. More specialized topics, such as arbitration and dispute resolution, the Chinese approach to intellectual property issues, or the use of joint ventures and other foreign investment vehicles, may also be included.

LAW 516

A study of pre-trial, trial, and appellate procedures in federal and Hawai‘i courts. Subjects considered include jurisdiction and the relationship between such courts, the relationship between procedural and substantive law, pleading and joinder, discovery, jury trial and the role of the judge, verdicts and motions after verdict, judgments and their enforcement, and appellate review.

This a prerequisite or recommended course for
LAW 517

Continuation of 516. Pre: 516.

Prerequisites/Recommended

This a prerequisite or recommended course for Advanced Civil Procedure
LAW 584
Typical Course Credit: 2

This course focuses on the civil rights of Americans and introduces alternative remedies and procedures for securing these rights. Statutory law, including 42 USC 1983, the Equal Pay Act, and various statutes prohibiting discrimination, are emphasized as well as Bivens-type actions, common law causes of action in tort, enforcement by the Justice Department and other government agencies, and criminal prosecution of civil rights violators. The course compares these litigation alternatives, noting their strengths and limitations, and studies the experiences of the lawyers who have used them.

LWJT 536C
Typical Course Credit: 1

An honors program for students who prepare for and compete in national advocacy. This course is graded on a credit/no credit basis. (C) Client Counseling Team; (E) Environmental Law Moot Court Team; (H) Native American Moot Court Team; (J) Jessup International Moot Court Team and (O) Other. Pre: selection by competition.

LWEV 530
Typical Course Credit: 3

Climate change is a core challenge that will influence law and policy well into the future. Will study climate change science, litigation, law and policy at state, national, and international levels. (Once a year)

LWPA 587
Typical Course Credit: 3

Introduction to the civil law tradition, particularly as exemplified by the legal systems of East and Southeast Asia. After a brief review of comparative law study and the historical development of the civil law, the course will examine the structure and role of the courts, judicial process, the legal profession and constitutional law and administrative law in Western Europe and in the Asian civil law countries.

LAW 538
Typical Course Credit: 3

The course, which is often called "private international law," involves examination and analysis of rules, approaches, and policies that determine which law, substantive and procedural, applies to transactions and events that touch more than one state, nation, or other jurisdiction. The central focus for study is "choice of law," but other areas include recognition of foreign judgments and jurisdiction.

LWEV 504
Typical Course Credit: 2

Real estate transactions are an important and growing conservation strategy; examines land transactions within the environment of conservation. (Once a year)

LAW 533

An introduction to the judicial function in constitutional cases that deals primarily with separation of powers and federalism issues. In addition to structural matters within the federal constitution, the course focuses on judicial review in economic and social contexts.

LAW 534

A continuation of Constitutional Law I, with special emphasis on due process, equal protection, and freedom of expression. This course examines core concepts of fairness and focuses particularly on racial and gender discrimination and the varied relationships between individual freedoms and the state. Pre: Constitutional Law I (LAW 533).

Prerequisites/Recommended

LAW 537
Typical Course Credit: 3

Seminar considers the impact of racism on American law and ways that individuals trained as lawyers might combat racism in our culture and within the institutions in which we live and work. Pre: 533. (Once a year)

Prerequisites/Recommended

LAW 540
Typical Course Credit: 2

Hands-on workshop class in drafting contracts, agreement, and similar documents for commercial/business purposes.

LAW 509

Law of private agreements. Explores the evolution and application of common law doctrines, and, where applicable, relevant provisions of the Uniform Commercial Code. Examines the bases of promissory liability, contract formation, mutual assent, defenses to enforcement, excuses, remedies and damages, and the rights and interests of third parties. Attention will be paid throughout the course to the role of contracts in a market society and the conflicting interests of certainty, freedom of contract and fairness.

This a prerequisite or recommended course for Contracts II
LAW 510

Continuation of 509. Pre: 509.

Prerequisites/Recommended

LAW 550
Typical Course Credit: 3

The course examines tax aspects of the formation, operation, reorganization, and liquidation of closely held corporations and partnerships. This course is geared to the non-specialist. Pre: Federal Income Taxation (LAW 567).

Prerequisites/Recommended

LAW 558

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the basic financial concepts and tools that are important for lawyers with transactional practices. Among the topics covered are valuation of businesses, legal rights of holders of various types of securities (including bonds, preferred stock, common stock and convertible securities), factors relating to the payment of dividends, and overall principles guiding the determinants of capital structures. Pre or Con: Business Associations (Law 531) or Instructor’s consent.

 

LAW 513
Typical Course Credit: 4

An examination of substantive rules and rationales of the criminal law. The course begins with a survey of criminal procedure from arrest through sentencing. Study of the criminal sentencing process raises important jurisprudential questions about the purposes and efficacy of criminal sanctions as a response to officially proscribed behavior. The heart of the criminal justice course is the study of general principles of American criminal law, including culpability criteria, the mental element in crimes, and definitional ingredients of crimes such as murder, rape, attempt, and conspiracy. The focus is on the Hawai‘i Penal Code, supplemented with comparative materials drawn from the common law and from the law of several Asian nations. Consistent with overall objectives of the first year of law study, the imparting and sharpening of general legal analytical skills is emphasized throughout the criminal justice course.

LAW 541

This course focuses on constitutional criminal procedure, with emphasis on fourth, fifth, and sixth amendment issues. In addition to search and seizure, interrogations and confessions, and right to counsel, the course addresses jury issues, including pretrial publicity in high profile cases, and issues such as indictments, plea bargains, and other pre-and post-trial procedural matters.

LAW 536
Typical Course Credit: 2

This course uses the current United States Supreme Court docket to engage in an in-depth study of vital contemporary and statutory rights claims in the area of civil rights and civil liberties law.

Prerequisites/Recommended

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