501
LAW

Organizing for Social Change: Anti-Subordination Theory & Practice

Law School Description

This class starts from a central tenet of American Constitutionalism – a government by the people – asks under what conditions people become active, self-governing agents. This course considers the relationship between jurisprudence and action. It incorporates the key questions of legal theory – what is justice, and what the relationship between law and justice is – with social change practice.

UH Mānoa Catalog Description

Examines conditions that lead people to become active, self-governing agents. Covered are strategies and tactics of organizers, history of social change movements, anti-subordination theories of justice and organizing case studies. Repeatable up to four credits. A-F only. (Once a year)

Typical Course Credit

3

Credit Limit

4

Repeat Limit

Not Repeatable

Instructor Approval

No

Competition

No

Assigned Sections

No

Bar Course

No

Clinical Requirement

No

Certificate(s)

Native Hawaiian Law

Tentative Course Rotation

Full Time
Annually
Spring
Part Time
Every Three Years
Spring

Effective Since

Fall
2002

Offering

Regular

Schedule Type

Lecture/Discussion (LED)
Seminar (SEM)

Major Restrictions

Law