501
LAW
Organizing for Social Change: Anti-Subordination Theory & Practice

Law School Description

This class starts from a central tenet of American Constitutionalism – a government by the people – asks under what conditions people become active, self-governing agents. This course considers the relationship between jurisprudence and action. It incorporates the key questions of legal theory – what is justice, and what the relationship between law and justice is – with social change practice.

UH Mānoa Catalog Description

Examines conditions that lead people to become active, self-governing agents. Covered are strategies and tactics of organizers, history of social change movements, anti-subordination theories of justice and organizing case studies. Repeatable up to four credits. A-F only. (Once a year)

Credit(s) for this CRN

3

Instructor Approval

No

Competition

No

Enrollment Cap

10

Bar Course

No

Clinical Requirement

No

Certificate(s)

Native Hawaiian Law

Instructor(s)

Office Hours

We 3:30p.m. to 4:00p.m.

Support Specialist

Julie Suenaga

Course Reference Number

87523