520B
LAW
Seminar in Comparative Constitutional Design

Law School Description

Faculty members or visiting scholars present selected topics focusing upon subject areas in their area of specialty or expertise.

UH Mānoa Catalog Description

Faculty members or visiting scholars present selected topics focusing upon subject areas in their area of specialty or expertise. (B) topic 1; (C) topic 2; (D) topic 3; (E) topic 4; (F) topic 5; (G) topic 6; (H) topic 7; (I) topic 8; (J) topic 9; (K) topic 10; (M) topic 11; (N) topic 12; (O) topic 13; (P) topic 14; (Q) topic 15.

Notes

This seminar focuses on the configurations of political institutions that might be apt for democratizing countries, especially those divided by ethnic or religious affiliations. In recent decades, constitution-making has become a much more international and comparative exercise than it was previously, with the result that democratizing or redemocratizing countries are more open to a wide range of institutions than they were previously. The seminar deals with many of the most common issues confronted by constitutional designers. It considers four overarching issues: (1) What are the sources of constitutional change, and what governs the choice of designers when they borrow institutions from abroad? (2) Are such institutions able to have a benign effect on ethnic and religious conflict? (3) What determines whether apt designs can in fact be adopted and by what mode they will be adopted? (4) Is there a single best process for constitution making?

Credit(s) for this CRN

1

Instructor Approval

No

Competition

No

Bar Course

No

Clinical Requirement

No

Instructor(s)

Course Reference Number

86428