Implicit Social Cognition in the Law

Implicit Social Cognition research shows that people automatically and unintentionally associate certain groups of people with negative attitudes and stereotypes. Legal scholarship has largely accepted the value of this research, but empirical projects have generally failed to investigate whether people's implicit biases operate in legal decision-making. This initiative seeks to close the gap between implicit social cognition methodology and legal literature by employing empirical studies designed to examine how implicit bias operates in the legal system.

Research Team

  • Linda H. Krieger, University of Hawai‘i (William S. Richardson School of Law)
  • Justin D. Levinson, University of Hawai‘i (William S. Richardson School of Law)
  • Susan K. Serrano, University of Hawai‘i (Center for Excellence in Native Hawaiian Law)
  • Robert J. Smith, University of North Carolina
  • Eric Yamamoto, University of Hawai‘i (William S. Richardson School of Law)
  • Danielle K. Young, Rutgers University

Contact

Justin D. Levinson

Professor of Law
Phone
(808) 956-3287